Contents

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Scope mounting can seem like a huge undertaking . After all the painstaking research on calibers, shooting platforms and optics … you want to be sure your scope and the bore of your rifle are both pointing at the same target when you head to the range. With a few simple tools and some patience and attention to detail, anyone can mount their scope and do it right.

How to Mount a Scope (And Not Screw It Up)

How to Mount a Scope (And Not Screw It Up)Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Scope mounting can seem like a huge undertaking . After all the painstaking research on calibers, shooting platforms and optics … you want to be sure your scope and the bore of your rifle are both pointing at the same target when you head to the range. With a few simple tools and some patience and attention to detail, anyone can mount their scope and do it right. Whether you are mounting a scope using traditional bases and rings on a bolt action rifle or you are using a cantilever one-piece mount for your AR, the basics are the same. Table of Contents Loading... Really, it’s a lot easier than it sounds. Watch – I’ll show you! Basic Tools The tools needed are few and simple but it is critical that you have them. While “normal” tools can work, they run a real risk of damaging your optics. Proper Screwdriver Bits Some mounting systems will have slotted screws for the base and rings. Some will have Allen head screws, some will have Torx head screws and some will have large nuts that require a socket. Purchase a good set of gunsmith bits and you’ll protect your fasteners and have tools that will last a lifetime. BROWNELLS MAGNA-TIP SETS 52 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 52 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Another note, not all bits are made equal. In fact, gunsmithing bits are a good bit different than “normal” bits. Normal bits are cut in a fashion that while cheap, doesn’t allow the bit to completely seat. This can lead to improper torq, stripping of the screw, and damage to the firearm. Gunsmithing bits are hollow-ground and allow the bit to seat properly, thus giving better torq, reduced wear, and far less chance of damage to the firearm. Proper screwdriver bits are a must when working on firearms. Torque Wrench The Fat Wrench is a simple torque wrench that is quickly adjustable for your base screws, ring screws and action screws. Proper torque keeps everything tight and square and ensures you do not tweak something during the mounting process. StandardFAT Wrench Wheeler also makes a digital FAT Wrench, this comes in really handy if you’re doing a lot of optics or if you’re mounting sensitive optics such as high-end precision long-range scopes. Digital FAT Wrench 50 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 50 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Loctite Get the BLUE, medium stuff. This will effectively keep your screws tight, but also allow you to remove the screws later so you can change mounts or optics. Blue Loctite 5 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 5 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing However, double check the owners manual for YOUR scope and rings. Some brands, such as Vortex Optics, recommends to not use Loctite since it can act as a lubricant and cause you to over torq your rings. Bubble Levels These are used to level the rifle and level the optic so your vertical and horizontal scope adjustments are perfectly in line with the bore of your rifle. Wheeler Bubble Levels 14 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 14 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Rubbing Alcohol Use this to clean the receiver or rail, bases, rings, and screws prior to mounting. You do not want oil in or on your scope mounting system. Rubbing Alcohol Cleaning Patches I use some 2 ½ inch square patches to clean my parts prior to mounting. Hoppe's Cleaning Patches 6 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 6 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Dial Caliper This can be used to help level the rifle with a bubble level and there is a quick way to check to see if the scope and rifle are square to each other. Dial Caliper You can get a good old fashioned dial caliper like mine or you can get a digital version. Electronic Digital Caliper 18 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 18 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing Gun Vice A way to keep your rifle or upper secure as you work. Trust me when I say this is by far the tool that will make your life easiest. You can get away with a starter gun vice, but if you’re a trinkerer – get a skookum vice. For a starter vice, I would recommend the Tipton Best Gun Vice . Tipton Best Gun Vice 80 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 80 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing It’s solid, built to last for the home gamer, and will allow you to work on almost any type of firearm and most bows and crossbows as well. However, if you’re really looking for a vice to last or if you work on your guns a lot – my favorite gun vice is the Tipton Ultra Gun Vice . Tipton Ultra Gun Vice 150 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 150 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing Finally, you need your optic, your base, rings, and screws. Mounting The Scope on a Bolt Action Rifle For this project I’m working on a Savage Axis package gun I won at conservation organization fundraiser last year. The rifle has a round top receiver and came with Weaver style two-piece bases and rings. The scope is a simple Bushnell 3×9. First, lay out all your tools and parts and make sure you have everything you need handy. Lay it out, double check you have it all! Be sure the rifle is unloaded and no ammunition is in the work area. Double check . I remove the bolt and magazine whenever I work on my guns. Isn’t it odd how many times we hear about guns going off when folks are cleaning them or working on them? There is no excuse for not taking the time to make sure your work area is safe. Next, dab a little rubbing alcohol on a cleaning patch and remove all the oil from the top of the receiver. Also clean the bottom of the bases, the screws, the rings and the screw holes in the rifle and the rings. Removing the oil ensures that your Loctite cures properly (if you’re going to use Loctite, double-check!) Test fit your bases. Be sure the holes in the base match the holes in the rifle. Loosely screw on your bases. No Loctite in this step. Attach the lower rings to the bases. Pay special attention to the height of the rings in this step. In some cases, the rings are different heights. Follow the manufacturer instructions and get the correct ring in the correct position. Now, gently place your scope in the rings. How much room do you have between the rings and the turret? How much between the eyepiece and the objective bell? In my case, I need to turn the bases around to allow more adjustment of the scope in the rings. See why we do a dry run first? The bases need to be reversed. Note how the rings are right against the objective bell and the ocular bell Now there is room between the rings and the objective and ocular bell. Once you are certain everything fits correctly you can start tightening things up step-by-step. Take all the parts off the rifle and start with your bases. Put just a drop of Loctite on the threads of each screw. Work with just one base at a time if two-piece. Snug up the screws using the proper driver bit. Now, take your Fat Wrench and adjust it to the specified torque for the base screws. Wheeler FAT Wrench Most base and ring sets will have a recommended torque for the screws. If you don’t find the info in the package jump online and do a search of the manufacturer of the mounting system. You will almost always find the info for the parts you have. If you have a problem finding the torque specs refer to the chart with your Fat Wrench. Use your dial calipers to measure the diameter of the screw and use the specs included with the wrench to set your torque. Next, fasten your bottom rings to the base. Follow the directions supplied with your rings. Again, a drop of Loctite on the threads of the attachment screws, snug up and torque to the specs provided. Now you are ready to set your scope in the bottom rings. Place the top rings over the scope and very lightly screw the rings down. Just enough to snug up the scope, but loose enough that you can turn the scope to level the reticle and move it back and forth to establish proper eye relief. Hot tip on eye relief – wear the glasses you plan to wear shooting when you set your relief. Even safety non-prescription glasses can alter your view. Leveling the Reticle You can use the two bubble levels for this step. Place one level on the action of the rifle. If you do not have a flat receiver or a rail you can insert the level in the action race to help level the rifle. I used the rail of my calipers held tightly to the bottom of the magazine well and put my level on the caliper rail. Using the calipers and bubble level I then placed my other level on the elevation dial on the scope. Once the rifle levels up, turn the scope in the rings to level it. Tighten the rings just a touch to hold the scope level. Bubble level on the scope To ensure proper eye relief pick up the rifle and shoulder it as you would for an offhand shot, but close your eyes first. Get a good cheek weld and hold the rifle just as you would when shooting. Now, open your eyes. Do you have a full, clear view through the scope? Try closing your eyes, mounting, looking and checking several times. You should see a full view with no black edges or a clear circle smaller than the diameter of your scope. If you do, adjust by moving the scope back and forth until you have a full field of view. Now, check your levels again to be sure the reticle is still square to the gun. Once you are satisfied that your eye relief is proper and your scope is square to the rifle, Loctite the threads of the ring screws and start snugging them up and torquing them to spec. The next to last step is bore sighting your rifle. Bore sighting is simply ensuring that the centerline of the barrel is looking at the same place at distance as the scope. If everything is square and true you should be close. I generally bore sight at 50 yards. I find that 25 yards are often too close. Remember, your scope is likely about 1.5 inches higher than the bore and at 25 yards you will very likely not see the same target spot. Set up the rifle on a rest or sandbags and look through the bore and line it up with your chosen target. Now, look through the scope and see where your crosshair hits the target. By simply adjusting your elevation and windage turrets you can move the crosshair to the same spot the bore “sees”. Ready for the range! Now let your Loctite cure overnight and head to the range! Mounting an Optic on an AR Platform Using a cantilever mount like the Burris P.E.P.R. (Proper Eye Position Ready) makes mounting easy and allows you to swap from an optic to open sights or place the optic on another flat top receiver. Burris AR-P.E.P.R Mount 70 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 70 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Your own testing will reveal if the optic comes back to zero after being removed then reattached. Always torque the base screws to the same spec each time. Check out this tutorial on mounting the P.E.P.R. First, be sure the gun is unloaded and the magazine is removed. Remove the upper from the lower and remove the bolt carrier group and charging handle. Use the rubbing alcohol and some patches to clean the rail, mount, and screws removing all oil from the parts. Attach the mount to the rail and snug up the mounting bolts. On the P.E.P.R. you will need a ¼ inch drive, ½ inch socket for the mounting bolts. Burris P.E.P.R. If you are not mounting a reflex sight or light or laser on top of the scope choose the smooth top rings to save some weight and prevent snagging on the rail sections. Set your scope in the bottom ring section. Place the top rings on and lightly snug up just the corner screws. In this case, the scope was too far forward for optimal eye relief. A rail makes moving the whole assembly back a bit super easy Once again, get your bubble levels and place one on the rifle’s rail and the other on top of the scope elevation turret. Level the scope reticle to the rifle and snug the ring screws just a touch. Reattach the upper and lower, and again shoulder the rifle with eyes closed. Open your eyes and check for proper eye relief. You can move the scope fore and aft in the rings or just move the entire mount on the rail until you find the correct mounting position. Be sure to use the same length of pull on the stock as you normally would shoot if you have an adjustable buttstock. Once you have established the proper eye relief recheck the level of the reticle to the rifle. Now, loosen one base screw and apply Loctite. Snug it up, loosen the other screw, apply Loctite, snug it up. Now torque to the supplied specs. In this case 65-inch/pounds. With this mount, you have six screws in each ring. With the four corner screws snugged to hold the scope, apply Loctite to the two remaining screws and torque them down on each ring. This will hold the scope securely and you can now remove, apply Loctite and torque the rest of the screws in each ring. Use an alternating pattern to tighten the ring screws. Remove the upper and lower halves again. Place the upper on a rest and go through the bore sighting process described above. Install your bolt carrier group and charging handle in the upper receiver, reattach the upper and lower and head to the range! Want another more lightweight option?  We love our Aero Ultralight Mounts. Aero Ultralight Mount 65 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 65 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A Note on Lapping the Scope Rings If you took your rifle to a gunsmith to have your scope mounted, they would likely lap your scope rings. But what is lapping ? Basically, it’s sanding down the inside of the rings to even them out and give the best surface to surface interface between the scope and the rings as possible. Lapping the rings for a scope So, you might be wondering, why isn’t this step included here? Simply – while the process isn’t hard, it is very easy to do wrong and ruin your rings. It is also completely unnecessary from a practical standpoint for normal field conditions. If you want to set your rifle up for precision long-range shooting, then it is an important step that shouldn’t be ignored. When I say “long-range” I define that as over 600-yards. For anything under that, there will be a fairly inconsequential gain to lapping the scope rings. But don’t worry – we’ll cover lapping of scope rings in another article soon! Notes For Those New to Guns and Optics Eye relief is the optimal distance from your eye to the rear lens on the scope. This distance allows you to see the full view the scope has to offer and places your eye and face far enough away so you do not get hit with the scope during recoil. Take your time getting the scope reticle and rifle as level to each other as you can. If the reticle looks “off” when you shoulder the rifle have someone place a level on the gun. Chances are you are canting the rifle. Meaning it is tilted to the side. Often where it feels most comfortable is not necessarily level. When shooting at long range this can make a difference as the scope elevation is dialed up. If not level your scope is not moving exactly in concert with the centerline of your bore. When zeroing a newly mounted scope, start at 25 yards. If you are on the target, most of the time you will be on at 100 yards. Do your fine tuning at 100 yards, then begin stepping out and ringing the steel at longer ranges! Still looking for the perfect scope? The Pew Pew Tactical Choosing a Rifle Scope Guide can help! Good luck with your newly mounted scope! What scope did you mount? What rings? Share your scope mounting tips and success down in the comments!

Smith and Wesson Governor Range Review

Smith and Wesson Governor Range Review

Recently, I had the pleasure of taking the Smith and Wesson Governor to the range. My first impression of this big S&W wheelgun is that it is a ton of fun. The Governor is a multiple caliber handgun. It fires .45 ACP (with moon clips), .45 Colt, and .410 gauge shot shells, so I tried out some of each to get a feel for how it handled with each caliber. Big gun. Big fun. Image courtesy of smith-wesson.com For anyone who already has some experience shooting .45 ACP, shooting with the Governor won’t be surprising. It has a little kick to it, but only slightly more than what I’m used to from shooting .45 semi autos. Which makes sense considering that, as a revolver, the Smith and Wesson Governor has no recoil spring to dampen perceived recoil. Shooting the .45 Long Colt was a little more fun. The recoil is more pronounced, but still manageable. Conveniently, one doesn’t need moon clips to shoot the .45 LC rounds. Just load up the six shot cylinder, aim, and fire. .410 is a notably “punchy” round when fired through a handgun, such as the 2.75″ barreled Governor. However, it falls short of the hefty recoil experience shooting .500 Magnum through the S&W Model 500 delivers. The Smith and Wesson Governor’s sights are a low profile notch and blade. The blade front sight features a white dot while the rear sight while a channel in the top of the frame serves as the snag-free front sights. The setup is slightly different from some of the other notch and blade sights featured on S&W revolvers. For example, the 686P has adjustable rear sights and a red ramped blade front sight. Overall, the Governor’s sights are still easy to align. This large Z frame revolver would not be feasible for this reviewer to carry, but it is an option I’d consider for home defense. My only compunction about using the Smith and Wesson Governor in that setting is the inability to mount a light or other similar low light aiming assistance. If I were to purchase the Governor for that purpose, I’d also want to look into laser grips or night sight options. Even if I choose not to use this handgun to defend my loved ones at home, it’s a dynamite time at the range, in all three calibers.

Best Glock Silencers & Suppressors [2020 Review]

Best Glock Silencers & Suppressors [2020 Review]

Let’s begin the discussion with a fun fact. Silencers and Suppressors refer to the exact same thing, however, silencer is the legal term, where suppressor is a casually used word for the same device. Silencers don’t actually silence the firearm, but they do reduce the shooting noise and recoil to some extent. A silencer is generally used so that the firearm creates less noise and flash during events like home defense , hunting, range shooting, or when used in noise restricted areas. Since Glocks are among the most popularly used handguns for all such purposes, we will learn about the benefits of adding a suppressor to a Glock. We will also review the top-of-the-line suppressors available for Glock pistols on the market. As a wrap-up, we have prepared a small FAQ section as well. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Silencers and Suppressors for your Glock OUR TOP PICK: Silencerco - Osprey .45 Suppressor Silencerco - Omega Silencer Gemtech - GM-45 Suppressor .45ACP Direct Thread BEST BUDGET OPTION: Advanced Armament - Illusion 9 Suppressor 9mm Luger 1/2-28 Gemtech - Tundra & Blackside Suppressors Comparison of the Best Glock Silencers & Suppressors IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Silencerco - Osprey .45 Suppressor Best 45 ACP Glock Suppressor For All Models Unique design to eliminate POI Issues Durable design with significant noise reduction View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Silencerco - Omega Silencer Compact and Lightweight Design Made from a mix of Stellite and stainless steel for durability Versatile design allows use with other guns "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" Gemtech - GM-45 Suppressor .45ACP Direct Thread Two Tube Design for Better Cleaning and Performance Reduced visual IR-Signature cover finish Full-auto rated silencer for continuous shooting View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option Advanced Armament - Illusion 9 Suppressor 9mm Luger 1/2-28 Best Suppressor for 9 mm Luger Glocks Allows quick adjustment of the rotational orientation Good for use on shooting range View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Gemtech - Tundra & Blackside Suppressors Best-In-Class Suppressor When Used Dry Matte black Cerakote finish with reduced IR-Signature Available in a couple of variants for different calibers View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews How to Choose a Glock Silencer Choosing the right silencer for your Glock requires you to consider certain aspects. These factors outline the important qualities of an ideal Glock suppressor and which you should look for when buying one. Material ​ The type of material used for making a silencer is directly related to its longevity. A silencer controls the pressure of expanding gasses, which is the cause of sound reduction. But a silencer made from less effective metals can melt down or crack, especially under repetitive auto fire, so it's better to choose a more durable and reliable silencer. Probably one made from some sort of hardened alloys. Caliber Silencers are not interchangeable among different calibers. You can still use large caliber silencers on small caliber weapons, but that’s really not feasible and requires different mounting mechanisms. So always choose a suppressor matching the caliber of your Glock. Silencerco - Osprey .45 Suppressor used in Glock ( Source ) Mounting Mechanism ​ Suppressors can either be thread-pitched or quick detach. Take note of the thread pitch of your Glock’s muzzle so you buy a silencer with compatible threading. If you want to interchange your silencer among different weapons quickly, you can also go for a quick detach type silencer. Usability ​ The prime purpose of a silencer is sound and recoil reduction. A 9mm pistol makes a sound of about 160 decibels. The safe limit of sound for your ears is 85 decibels. So adding a silencer to your Glock is an intelligent decision. Furthermore, you should purchase a silencer with significant levels of noise and recoil reduction and probably appealing aesthetics. POI ​ POI stands for Point of Impact. It is the shift in the aiming point of the weapon after you mount a suppressor to the barrel. Consider buying a suppressor with a minimal POI shift. Quick Take - The Best Glock Suppressors These are our recommendations for the best Glock suppressors: Silencerco - Osprey .45 Suppressor Silencerco - Omega Silencer Gemtech - Gm-45 Suppressor .45acp Direct Thread Review of the Best Glock Suppressors Now that we have discussed the aspects of buying a suppressor, it's time to take a look at some of the best Glock suppressors on the market. These silencers have been handpicked based upon their qualities and positive customer reviews across the online community. 1. Silencerco - Osprey .45 Suppressor CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable and Reliable Works With Many Guns Easy to Install and Remove Significant Reduction in Sound Eccentric Body Eliminates POI Issues Cons Might Obstruct Tac-light Field of View Silencerco has its own expertise when it comes to manufacturing silencers. The same goes for this eccentric suppressor model named Osprey. The silencer has been made from 6061 T6 aluminum, the same material used for manufacturing receivers and other durable gun parts. This testifies to the durability and reliability of the suppressor. The silencer has been specifically designed for the .45 ACP caliber, however, you can still use it with 40 S&W and 9mm Glocks. The suppressor significantly reduces the noise levels of your Glock to 132.5 dB, which is an almost 25% reduction compared to the normal sound of a 9mm Glock. The suppressor has an eccentric body, which means that the bore doesn’t run down the middle of the tube. This feature helps with keeping most parts of the silencer beneath the bore’s centerline, thus not affecting the POI of your weapon. This also eliminates the POI issues with cylindrical silencers, so you can use the factory sights or any other sights on your weapon with ease. The Osprey Suppressor achieves its purpose in a limited space compared to round silencers. It has 30% extra internal volume compared to a cylindrical silencer  Due to its design mimicking the slide of a Glock , the silencer can be easily holstered into any open-bottom holster. Additionally, it has a QD setup which allows you to quickly remove it when not in use. You only have to thread the mount onto your barrel and you’re done. The suppressor is aesthetically pleasing and works with many guns. Bottom Line The Osprey 45 Suppressor features an intelligent design to improve the volume and maintain the POI. The silencer is durable and easy to install. It can be used for range use, home defense, and even hunting if you desire. 2. Silencerco - Omega Silencer CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Versatile Easy to Install Compact Design Significantly Reduces Noise Durable and Reliable Construction Cons None Another product from Silencerco in our list - the Omega silencer. It features a cylindrical design which can be mounted on the muzzle of your Glock using a mount, which comes inside the package. The silencer has been made from a mix of Stellite and stainless steel. This makes the silencer extremely durable and reliable. The silencer is blast erosion-resistant and is rated for full-automatic use, so you can comprehend the level of reliability for these silencers. The silencer is available in a couple of different models for the 9mm and 45ACP calibers. On top of that, these silencers can be interchanged and mounted to 300 AAC Blackout rifles with impressive sound suppression for both supersonic and subsonic rounds. The silencer has a compact design, with a limited length and diameter, so you can carry it on your Glock with ease. The silencer delivers significant reduction in noise from your Glock. Due to its compact design, it doesn’t interfere with the sights of your handgun . Plus, you can use it with reflex sights , tac lights , and lasers. The silencer is extremely durable and is known to reduce the blast noise of a 9mm to 131.5 dB and a 40 S&W to 136.2 dB, which are both significant reductions. The silencer can be mounted on pistols, rifles, and submachine guns, so it is quite versatile as well. Bottom Line This Omega Silencer is a compact and durable noise reduction solution for your Glock. The silencer is small enough to be carried with ease and is also reliable since it has been rated for full-auto use. 3. Gemtech - Gm-45 Suppressor .45ACP Direct Thread CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Lightweight Easy to Clean Easy to Install Durable and Reliable "Works With Many" Guns Cons None Gemtech came up with an innovative design for a suppressor, so we had to include it in the list. The GM-45 suppressor is made from 7075 aluminum, which speaks of its quality and durability. The silencer has a cylindrical body, with a black matte anodized finish over the core and Matte Black Cerakote with Reduced Visual-IR Signature on the cover. The Gm-45 Suppressor is a combination of two different tubes, where the inner cylinder is grilled and the outer housing cylinder is sealed on the surface. These tubes can be separated from each other for proper cleaning and maintenance of the silencer. This is an exclusive feature you won’t find with most other silencers on the market. This silencer accepts 9mm, .45 ACP, .40 S&W, and 10mm cartridges so you interchange it onto different handguns with appropriate threading pitch (5/8-28) for the mount. The silencer has been tested to reduce the noise anywhere between 21-35 decibels for your Glock, which is a significant reduction. It weighs a mere 5.5 oz, so it doesn’t add any significant amount of weight to your Glock. All GM-45 suppressors are shipped with a .578-28 standard piston, so mounting is not an issue. The silencer is full-auto rated, so you can use it for rigorous shooting sessions. Bottom Line The Gemtech GM-45 suppressor is an easy to clean and lightweight noise reduction apparatus for your Glock. The silencer can be easily installed and works with many different calibers. 4. Advanced Armament - Illusion 9 Suppressor 9mm Luger 1/2-28 CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable and Reliable Easy to Install and Clean Offset, Non-Centralized Design Cons A Bit Lengthy Fits Only 9mm Models The Illusion 9 Suppressor from Advanced Armament is a compact and reliable suppressor for mounting on 9mm Glocks. The silencer features an offset, non-centralized bullet path. Plus, the silencer allows the user to quickly adjust the rotational orientation of the silencer to provide an unobstructed sight picture of the target. This feature is extremely helpful with standard height-sights as you don’t have to replace them with taller ones. The silencer features a heat-treated stainless steel inner, with blast baffles to significantly reduce the noise. The inner core can be separated from the outer can for cleaning and maintenance, without the use of any specialized tools. This easy-to-clean design is quite useful if you burn through a lot of ammo at the range, especially the lead-based type. The silencer has ½-28 TPI threads to attach to any weapon with the right adapter. Bottom Line The Illusion 9 suppressor is a durable and easy to clean addition for 9mm Glocks and pistol rifles. The silencer is a bit lengthy for regular carry, however, it is exceptional for range use. 5. Gemtech - Tundra & Blackside Suppressors CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable and Reliable Compact and Lightweight Doesn’t Interfere With POI Cons Difficult to Clean The Tundra and Blackside suppressors from Gemtech feature a durable and compact design, which is apt for mounting on Glock pistols. The silencers are to be used dry and claim to outperform most other silencers in their category. However, you can also add small amounts of coolant for better noise reduction and performance. The diameter of these cans is limited, not to affect your point of impact. The Tundra Suppressors have been designed to work with 9mm caliber, whereas the Blackside ones are for .45 and .40 calibers. These suppressors are compact enough to be used for EDC, home defense, and range use. The Tundra silencers can be mounted on adapters/barrels with a ½-28 TPI thread, whereas the Blackside suppressors are compatible with .578-28 threads. The silencers can be easily removed and attached to the Glock and can also be holstered on most open-end holsters. Bottom Line The Tundra and Blackside silencers are compact and effective dry suppressors for your Glock, especially for the compact and subcompact models. Are Gun Silencers Legal? - Regulation 101 Yes, in the majority of states. Silencers for guns are legal in 42 out of 50 states of the United States of America. However, that does not imply that you can just buy it on an online sale and expect it to reach you with a week. The sale and possession of silencers are explicitly regulated by the law. Per 2019 Legality Silencers can be compared to receivers, as they have their own serial number for registration purposes. To buy a silencer, you have to pay a tax of $200 through a revenue stamp. Not only that, buying a silencer requires you to go through a criminal background check. The possession of silencers falls under the authority of the National Firearms Act (NFA) division of the BATFE (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives). The illegal possession of silencers is considered to be a serious crime and can buy a violator a term of up to 30 years in prison. Some states and municipalities also have their local laws regarding the use of silencers. For example, Connecticut and Vermont allow the possession silencers but prohibit hunting with them. How to Attach a Glock Suppressor Note: Please check your Glock for safety before attempting any kind of service or maintenance. Remove the magazine and pull the slide to cross verify. Attaching a suppressor to a Glock is not that complicated, especially if you know how to disassemble and clean it. But before we start, you must take note of the fact that you need a muzzle threaded barrel for mounting a suppressor. Factory Glock barrels don’t have that, so you might have to get a new one. Now, cock the action back and push the takedown leverage pin to remove the slide. Once it is done, remove the recoil spring gently from the slide and set it aside. Now, pull the barrel out, and replace it if it's not threaded. Put the barrel into the slide, drop the recoil spring back into position, and lock the slide on the receiver using the takedown pin. Next, take the silencer and screw it all the way down on the threaded end of the barrel. Make sure to tighten it properly, but not too tight. Now, cock the slide all the way back and pull the trigger to check the mechanism. Aim the Glock in a safe direction to check the POI and if the sights are aligning properly. For more detailed instructions and the steps involved, please take a look at this video below: Conclusion The primary purpose of installing a suppressor to a Glock is to reduce the noise created upon firing a shot. Suppressors are known to reduce this noise by almost 20%, which is a good feature for general use and tactical situations. A good suppressor must be durable, reliable, easy to install, easy to clean, and should not interfere with the POI. People Also Ask Your brain might be buzzing with some questions you need the answers for right away. To address the general doubts related to this topic, we compiled a short FAQ section to help you, so you may still your thirst of curiosity. Do I Need a Threaded Barrel for a Silencer? Absolutely, yes. A threaded barrel is required to screw on the threads of the silencer since it is a more sturdy and reliable setup because the bullet exits from the muzzle end. However, there are suppressors with QD mounts that can be screwed onto a threaded barrel for quick attachment and detachment. How Does a Silencer Work? To understand that, you must understand what creates the noise. When you shoot a bullet, the heated gasses created by the burning of gunpowder expand rapidly, thus propelling the bullet out of the barrel. When these gasses exit the barrel, they transition from extremely high pressure to low pressure, which creates the sound. A barrel provides extra space to make this transition more gradual and efficient, which results in a reduction of noise. Do Gun Silencers Really Work? Yes, they do. But not in the way Hollywood shows them to work. You’re not going to hear a ‘whip’ sound when you fire your weapon with the suppressor on. For example, shooting a 9mm Glock creates a sound of around 160 dB. A suppressor brings it down to approximately 130 dB. So you’ll definitely hear a ‘bang’, just not as loud as without a suppressor. Can You Legally Make a Suppressor? Yes. It is perfectly legal to make a suppressor on your own if you have submitted an application and received an approval using ATF form 1 to BATFE. But remember that making a suppressor requires specialized tools and appropriate knowledge of the trade. Plus, you have to reside in a ‘suppressor-legal’ state. Are Silencers and Suppressors the Same Thing? Yes. Silencer and suppressor refer to the same thing-a device that is used to dampen the noise created by a weapon when it shoots a bullet. Silencer is the more legal term used in paperwork, whereas suppressor is a casual term used by the general public. Do Gun Suppressors Wear Out? Yes, to some extent, they do. Everything has an age. The suppressors undergo extreme pressure of the gasses exiting the barrel. Their job is to handle this pressure efficiently, so they will undergo wear and tear over time, just like the barrel. However, the longevity depends upon their quality, maintenance, and shooting durations Does a Silencer Slow Down a Bullet? No. The silencer does not slow down a bullet. It does not interfere with the movement of a bullet. However, they are known to often aid accuracy. Can Any Gun Have a Silencer? As long as a gun has a threaded barrel and an apt adapter, it can have a silencer. Weapons ranging from sub-compact pistols to large caliber rifles have been known to have silencers. Although, the important thing to note here is that suppressors perform the best when used with their respective caliber. Plus, large caliber suppressors will work on smaller caliber guns, but the reverse is not possible.

First Look: Heckler & Koch SP5

First Look: Heckler & Koch SP5

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d0e3e44e_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d0e3e44e_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } With the same look and feel as the Heckler & Koch MP5, the SP5 is made to mirror the legend. How The HK SP5 Mimicks The Iconic MP5: 8.86-inch Navy type barrel Threaded tri-lug adaptor Paddle magazine release Fluted chamber and chrome-lined bore Roller-delayed blowback operated Well, here's a little something to stuff a stocking. Dubbed the SP5, the semi-automatic is close as you'll get to Heckler & Koch's legendary MP5–short of getting on Secret Service detail. Look, feel, the whole shebang, except full-auto. You can't have everything. Related GunDigest Articles 4 Qualities Your Concealed Carry Gun Must Have SCCY Adds Red-Dot Pistols With CPX Expansion Best Pistol Reviews To Find A Superb Semi-Auto (2019) Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Still, you get pretty dang close, with the 9mm SP5 boasting an 8.86-inch Navy type barrel with threaded tri-lug adaptor, paddle magazine release, fluted chamber and chrome-lined bore. And, of course, it’s roller-delayed blowback operated, which is a staple of Heckler & Koch. Also, it’s a boon in the semi-auto version, given it should help guarantee the accuracy of the pistol, not to mention make it more pleasurable to shoot. Adding a bit more authenticity, the pistol also rolls off the same line as the MP5 in HK's Oberndorf factory in southwest Germany. This should reflect in the SP5’s quality, given the same workforce that produces its full-automatic cousin are the folks putting together the civilian variant. As far as the gun’s specs, it’s 17.8 inches in length, weighs 5.1-pounds and is 2.48-inches in width. It’s outfitted with a rear sling ring, for the use of elastic style slings and, not quite true to form, has rear notch sight drum (the MP5 uses an aperture). Additionally, the rear cap is replaceable with a brace or stock, if you’re up for paying to make it an NFA short-barreled rifle.

Long Range Shooting [Intro & Fundamentals]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s “SEND IT.” Search for “long range shooting” and you’ll likely be overwhelmed . There will be articles about optics, cartridges, barrels, stocks, and triggers. You’ll see terms like Coriolis and spindrift and station pressure. A herd of long-range rifles means a good day no matter where you are! It’s like the shooters who practice the dark art of long range precision shooting are speaking a language known only to a select few. But rest assured, shooters of all backgrounds, experience, and skill levels can learn the ins and outs of long range shooting. We’ll walk you through some of the basics so you can get started. Then decide if you want to go down the rabbit hole. Table of Contents Loading... What is Long Range Shooting? Long range is a subjective term and every shooter has a distance that, for them, is considered long range. It might be experience or it might be equipment related. HBH 1000 Known Distance Range For someone brand new to the rifle making a shot at 100 or 200 yards may be a very big deal. If you are shooting an iron-sighted lever gun in .357 magnum, long range for you is likely 150 yards or so. The man, the myth, the legend — Jerry Miculek hitting a 1,000 yard shot with a 9mm revolver However, I’m going to assume that for most shooters, long range means hitting targets at distances like 800 or more yards. Just think, a 30-inch wide target at 1000 yards is the same as hitting a 3-inch target at 100 yards… sort of. Both targets are just 3-MOA (Minutes of Angle). In order to hit that 3-MOA target, some basics are needed. Steel at 300, 428, 505, 637, 718, and 1000 yards Just to be clear though, reading this article will not make you an expert marksman. There is a lot more to talk about and a lot more detail to cover. This is just the first taste of what long range shooting is, we’ll be covering more topics and in more depth soon! Basic Gear Of course, you need a rifle, scope and quality ammunition. I don’t think you need to go crazy spending a ton of money to hit targets at long range. Solid rests, a range finder, spotting scope, and a notebook are some basics that are helpful What you do need is a rifle capable of 1-MOA or less at 100 yards with a good trigger. Take a look at the Ruger American Predator or Howa 1500 as entry-level long-ranger plinkers. Howa 1500 in MDT and Boyds ‘ – top to bottom: MDT ESS, MDT LSS-XL Gen 2, Boyds’ Platinum, Boyds’ AT-One Your optic doesn’t need to be a top of the line Nightforce. But, you do need a scope that allows you to see the target clearly at all ranges and has repeatable turret adjustments. 9 tested and proven Long Range Optics ! A zero stop is nice, but not absolutely necessary. Just remember how many clicks you came up for your last shot, then dial back to zero before your next shot at a different distance. Factory loads or handloads; both work just fine in an accurate rifle Factory ammunition today is incredible. You can buy very high-quality ammo with high-BC bullets made to perform at long range. Rifles in calibers that do not recoil much allow you to see bullet impacts on target and, if the conditions are right, you can see the bullet trace all the way to the target. This helps you determine if your elevation and windage corrections are right for the target you are engaging in. For rifles chambered in 6 and 6.5 Creedmoor , you can expect a barrel life of about 2500 to 3000 rounds. Some of the most popular rifle calibers If you opt for the lowly .223 Remington you will probably get about 7000-10,000 rounds of accurate shooting and save money on ammo. You don’t need the latest and greatest to make hits a long way out if you are doing your job correctly. Don’t discount AR’s or Modern Sporting Rifles . With the proper ammo, consistent hits out past 700 yards are very possible. The CZ 527 & Rock River Entry Tactical are both sub-½ MOA rifles. Hits beyond 700 yards are not uncommon for these rifles. We even have an article on long-range shooting an AR platform . A rangefinder is helpful if you don’t know the range to the target. You can estimate the range using the scope reticle, but only if you know the dimensions of the target. So unless you are at a range that has the distances marked you need some way to determine how far away the target is so you can make the correct scope adjustments. If you have a rangefinder you use for hunting that will be fine, most will work reliably out to about 800 yards. Runner Up Vortex Optics Ranger 1500 340 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 340 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A quality bipod on your rifle helps to make shooting prone or off some sort of natural or man-made support much easier. We always recommend a shooter invest in a Harris Bipod that has the ability to swivel so no matter the terrain, the gun can be fired from a perfectly level attitude. Harris Bipods 70 at Optics Planet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 70 at Optics Planet Compare prices (2 found) Optics Planet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing If you don’t have a bipod, you can use your backpack, sandbags or something similar to rest the forearm of your rifle. The key is a stable platform to shoot from. For more choices check out our Best Bipods article. You will need a rear bag to support the butt of the rifle. This can be as simple as a couple of old socks filled with rice and knotted tight. I use old shot bags filled with varying amounts of old tumbler media. Caldwell DeadShot Boxed Combo Front and Rear Bag 20 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing They are lightweight, can be stacked and combined as needed and provide a way for me to apply pressure by squeezing to adjust the vertical alignment of my rifle. Proper hearing protection is a must. Most folks who delve into long range shooting will install a muzzle brake of some sort to reduce or eliminate recoil. Tested Shooting Ear Protection Muffs No matter how you slice it, brakes are loud. I normally wear quality shooting earplugs under my ear muffs. You only get one chance with your hearing, take time to protect it as much as you can. Double up on your ear pro. Rifles with brakes are extremely loud! Nice To Have Ballistic Calculator As you shoot, you will begin to learn how your rifle and ammo perform at various ranges. There have been several articles that discuss various apps that allow you to enter the important data for your rifle, optic, and ammo choices. Then, as you begin to stretch out the range, the app calculates how much you need to dial up the scope and how much windage you need to dial or hold depending on the conditions. The app will also help to verify the velocity of your bullets depending on your hits. If you are sailing rounds way over the target, likely your bullet is moving faster than you think it is. The info on the cartridge box may not be correct for the conditions you are shooting in. .223 Handloads For "Long Range Shooting" If you have powder that is sensitive to temperature changes, your velocity may also increase or decrease. You can make adjustments in the app to correct for velocity variations. For a new long-range shooter, the Shooter App is easy to use and you can store a ton of info in it. If you don’t have an app yet, go to JBM Ballistics and print a “drop chart” for your rifle. I have used it quite a bit this summer and the adjustments have been pretty close for the range I have access to. Ballistic card made with JBM Ballistics Wind Meter The Kestrel 2700 weather meter is packed full of features! This little tool will allow you enter critical atmospheric data into to your app and help you make better adjustments to your optics. A range finder, a wind meter, and smartphone make long range shooting much simpler. Things like elevation, barometric pressure, humidity, and temperature all affect the flight of your bullet. Kestrel 2700 Ballistics Weather Meter 179 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 179 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) EuroOptic (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing For sure the little wind speed indicator is key. If you know how hard and from what direction the wind is blowing you know how much windage you need to dial or hold. A wind meter is nice but not absolutely necessary. If you really want to “buy once, cry once” the Kestrel 5700 Elite has a ton more features, but at a much higher price. "Kestrel 5700 Elite" Ballistics Meter 699 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 699 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Long Range Shooting Skills Obviously you need to have some understanding and grasp of good shooting technique to consistently hit at long range. Don’t expect to be ringing every shot the first time out, precision shooting is about consistency and practice. We could write volumes, and volumes have been written, on how to be a better and more accurate shooter. But right now — let’s just cover the basics. Breathing A lot has been written regarding breathing and heartbeat over the years. Don’t get too hung up on taking in a deep breath, letting out half, holding and breaking the trigger at just the right time. I like to breathe normally as I get my rifle aligned and level. Once I am on target I let my breathing slow and relax as much as possible. I tend to squeeze off my shot just as my lungs reach the bottom of the exhale. Breathing exercises are relaxing and useful. At this point, my heartbeat is slowest, and because I am not trying to hold my breath, my body doesn’t tense up and my heart rate doesn’t speed up as my heart and brain search for fresh oxygen. Trigger Control Today’s rifles either have great triggers or can be upgraded with a great trigger. For a rifle used exclusively from a bench or competition a trigger of around 2 pounds that breaks cleanly will improve your shooting. If your rifle is doing double duty in the field as a hunting arm I would suggest adjusting your trigger to around 3.5 – 4 pounds. Use the area on your index finger just beyond the last joint When you place your finger on the trigger you want to use the area on your index finger just beyond the last joint. If you press on this area you can feel a hard, bony structure. You want that bony section of your finger on the trigger. This gives you a consistent feel and a consistent finger placement. If you use the pad of the index finger you have a ‘mushy’ feel to your trigger squeeze. In addition, if your hands are cold, you often cannot feel the ends of your fingers and if you use the pad of your finger you cannot tell how much pressure you are putting on the trigger. Gripping the Gun When shooting from the bench let the bench and the bipod and the rear bag do all the work. For most rifles you are going to use for long-range shooting, recoil is minimal and you don’t need to hold the gun in a death grip. Be sure you adjust your seat so you are sitting directly behind the gun. You want to line up with your shoulders square to the target and not be angled off to the side. Off a bench or off a tank trap, square up! Your strong hand or the hand you squeeze the trigger with is going to rest on the grip area with your trigger finger indexed outside the trigger guard until you are ready to shoot. Use your remaining three fingers to gently pull the gun into your shoulder pocket. The gun needs to be firmly anchored to your shoulder, but not to the point you are really pulling hard. Your thumb should rest on top of the grip, or if using a stock with a pistol grip, be resting along the side. You do not need to grip the gun with your thumb. Thumb on top of the grip, you don’t need your thumb wrapped to have a steady grip! If using a bipod, lean forward a bit to ‘load’ the legs of the bipods once you are well-positioned. Be sure your cheek has good contact with the stock and that you can clearly see the entire image through your scope. On a fixed stock rifle you have fewer options for adjustment than with a modular stock or chassis, but you should still be able to comfortably align your body and your eye to the optic. Your ‘off’ hand controls your rear bag. Squeezing your rear bag to adjust your hight and aim while also giving yourself a solid shooting rest. By squeezing the bag you raise the butt of the rifle and your scope reticle will move down in relation to your target. If you ease pressure on the bag the reticle climbs and moves higher. By using the bag you control the movement of the vertically and, to some extent, horizontally. Your left elbow and forearm are resting nearly flat on the bench at this point. Your trigger hand is going to make any vertical or horizontal turret adjustments, make parallax adjustments, squeeze the trigger and work the bolt. Trigger hand to adjust the scope Shooting and Follow Through When you are aligned with the target and have your optic dialed in for the distance and the wind conditions you are ready to shoot. If you are letting the gun rest on the bipod and rear bag and not placing any unnecessary pressure on the grip, the rifle should recoil straight back and come to rest very near the center of the target you were holding on. Even with big calibers like .50 BMG, the rifle will remain relatively flat with proper shooter technique. Keep your eyes open through the shot. Today’s optics will allow you to see not only your impact on the steel, but in many cases you will see the bullet trace all the way to the target. This only happens if your follow-through is good and you let the rifle recoil naturally. Don’t fight it. If you are shooting a lightweight mountain rifle, you may want to invest in a shooting pad, or simply place a sandbag between your shoulder and the butt of the rifle. For real thumpers, a bag of shot or sand can make your day much more pleasant. You may also find that a lightweight rifle or one with a thin barrel profile will shoot better if held more tightly and with some additional pressure forward into the bipod. If you are doing your job you should be able to reach up with your trigger hand, work the bolt, and be ready to shoot again very quickly. Don’t raise your cheek off the stock. Don’t move your head. Just work the bolt, acquire your target and fire again. Dry Fire Practice We are all capable of training more and getting better regardless of the type of rifle we are shooting and the type of shooting we normally do. One of the biggest reasons shooters miss or fail to shoot consistently small groups is flinching. I know… you never flinch. You’re not afraid of recoil. Your gun doesn’t kick very hard. I’m willing to bet that if we take some time and do the Ball and Dummy Drill, nearly every shooter will flinch at some point. At 1000 yards it takes very little movement of the rifle to cause a miss. A microscopic flinch will make you miss. Take a few minutes every week to do some dry fire practice. Set up in your yard, or depending on your neighborhood and neighbors, in your house and garage and practice dry firing. Remove all the ammo from your practice area and double and triple-check that your gun is unloaded and pointed in a safe direction. Shoot from prone with your normal set up and supports. Really focus on getting a good sight picture and squeezing the trigger so smoothly that when the hammer falls the reticle does not move from the center of the point you are holding on. Exaggerate your follow-through. Don’t blink or close your eyes. Have someone watch to see if your eyes close when the hammer falls. Now, work the bolt and do it again, and again, and again. Lynx TD15 straight pull bolt action rifle The top shooters in every discipline spend way more time dry firing than they do running live fire drills. When you do get to the range take a few minutes to go through some dry fire exercises to get relaxed and comfortable with the gun before you start sending rounds downrange. If you don’t normally have access to a long range, practice shooting the best groups you can at 100 yards, over and over and over. One of the best long-range shooters I know spends most of his live fire practice in prone on the 100-yard range. Homework It might seem like we just covered a lot of information, but this is just the very start of the first course when it comes to long range precision shooting! You’ll want to get more information, to start you off I highly recommend Ryan Cleckner’s Long Range Shooting Handbook — it is truly a definitive source for beginners to precision shooting. Long Range Shooting Handbook 10 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 10 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing You should also take a look at our guides on the Best 1000 Yard Guns for Under $1000 and Best Long Range Rifle Scopes ! PSA .224 Valkyrie At High Bar Homestead Final Thoughts Long range shooting is more available and more achievable than ever before. Rifles are better than ever, and paired with some good ammo with high-BC bullets, long shots are makeable with just about any cartridge you care to try with. Assorted 6.5 Creedmoor (L to R: Federal FMJ, Soft 129gr, Ballistic Tip 120gr, Gold Medal 140gr) Optics that used to be exotic are now commonplace and within the budgets of most shooters. The bottom line though is your training and practice. You can’t just buy your way to long-range precision. Learn to read the weather and the wind. Learn and practice your basic shooting fundamentals. Dry fire a lot. Just like anything, the more work you put in, the luckier you seem to get. And those shots that seem out of reach initially, begin to be commonplace and you start looking farther out on the horizon and wonder, “can I hit that rock way over on the other side of the canyon?” Tell us about your long range shooting experiences and the things you do to train for competitions or open-country hunting! Looking to take an AR-15 long range? Check these out! Best AR-15s for Precision Long Range Shooting AR-15 Long Range Shooting with .223/5.56 Best 6.5 Grendel Uppers 6.5 Grendel Hunting Setup

Best 1911 Pistols For the Money [2020]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The most recognizable handgun in the world is the M1911 . Old Colt 1911 John Moses Browning’s tried and true design hasn’t changed much over the years, but now there are some new features and more calibers…opening this pistol up to even more shooters. But, where do you start ? Some 1911s There are so many different types of 1911s on the market that almost no one knows where to start.  The good news is that there’s a perfect 1911 for you at your preferred budget. Whether you’re scraping the bottom of the barrel to put enough cash together so you can join the club, or you’re looking to spend your tax refund on a high end 1911…we’ve got you covered! Table of Contents Loading... Quick Background History of M1911 But first…a little history of the 100+-year-old design.  I promise this will shine some light on how to choose the best 1911 for yourself. Genius firearms inventor John Moses Browning (so famous on forums that he is just JMB) sought out to give the military a more potent handgun round. JMB He was in direct competition with other gun makers like Smith & Wesson and Savage…and in March 1911 his auto-loading pistol was officially adopted by the US Military as their sidearm of choice. The 1911 stood up to a 6,000 round torture test, being submerged in mud, acid, shooting deformed cartridges, and other tests. Not only did Browning’s design (to be produced by Colt) pass with flying colors, it was the only gun to pass all stages of this grueling test. .45 ACP The military needed a deadlier handgun round than the .38 Long Colt being used at the turn of the century and wanted it to utilize a .45 caliber bullet.  The Army had a long history with forty-five caliber cartridges, with the Single Action Army revolver (SAA) being used for many years. Colt "Single Action Army" The ultimate replacement would be John Browning’s 1911 chambered in .45 Automatic (AKA .45 ACP, .45 Auto, .45 Automatic Colt Pistol). .45 ACP Ball vs Hollowpoint This .45 Auto contained a 230-grain projectile capable of reaching speeds of about 850 feet per second and was much more capable as a self-defense round than the .38 Long Colt was. Learn more about calibers in our Basic Bullet Guide . Popular Pistol Calibers Other 1911 Manufacturers Many purists decry other brands of 1911s (or calibers) as fakes…unworthy to bear the name. One thing that many people don’t realize, however, is that the demand for them was so high during the war, that Colt contracted out to other companies to help keep production numbers up. Some very well-known companies helped, to include Remington Rand, Ithaca, Springfield Armory, many foreign companies, and even the Singer sewing machine company. Singer 1911 In fact, the pistols from these other companies can command a very high price when sold.  Some of the Singer pistols can be worth up to $30,000 to the right buyer because so few were made. Modern Uses The 1911 style is still in service in a few select military units , some police, and is a widely accepted pistol for self-defense, regardless of the maker or size of the cartridge. Marines with 1911’s If you glance in the gun cabinet of many gun enthusiasts, you’ll likely see at least one 1911 pistol.  Many people own more than one because as far as pistols go, they are accurate, reliable, and pleasant on the eyes. Many of the major shooting sports also allow a class for shooting 1911 style pistols, because, even though the original design is well over 100 years old, it’s not going anywhere, anytime soon. 1911 Diagram In fact, if you were to look at one of Colt’s current offerings, the Model 70 ($900), it’s as close to the original M1911A1 as you can possibly get.  It’s as if it came out of the factory in 1924 when the 1911 was first reworked into the A1. Colt 1911 Series 70 Best 1911 Pistols First, let me start by saying that this is not an easy list to narrow down because there are so many excellent pistols being made by many different companies. Next, this list of firearms is chosen by me .  You obviously have your own opinion, which I want to hear too. 1911s with Lights & Lasers Finally, this list is meant to feature a wide variety of guns currently on the market and not just those made by Colt. And not just .45 ACP… 9mm vs .45 ACP $500-$600 Range: The guns at this level are NOT exceptional guns, but ones that will do the job and get better with a minimal amount of work. These are for people who want a 1911 but cannot afford to go out and buy an expensive, ready to roll out of the box, uber expensive 1911. 1. Rock Island Armory 1911 I shot my first  "Rock Island Armory" pistol during SHOT 2017.  I’ve always known them but never had a chance to try any out. Most Affordable 1911 Rock Island Armory 1911 520 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 520 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing And try out a lot I did.  My favorite was their longslide 1911 but their standard 1911 ($520) was great too. Sure, it needs some loving if you’re a little spoiled by other makers…but it went bang every time and when I did my part…hit all the plates.  They are designed by Armscor and manufactured in the Philippines.  A full review of the GI model here . Rock Island Armory 1911 GI Midsize They have plenty of other models too with the same good price points if you’re looking with something more…tactical. $700-$900 Range This is the most popular section of guns.  These are the ones that people can save up for over the course of time to get a gun that doesn’t need any work, but can still be customized into a beauty. 2. Springfield Armory Mil-Spec Springfield Armory makes great guns, even though many people believe they could do less stamping on them (think “Grip Zone” on the XD Mod 2). Springfield Armory Mil-Spec 699 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 699 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing The Mil-Spec ($729) doesn’t have any extra words on it and is a gorgeous firearm with a 5” barrel that’s available in stainless steel or with a parkerized finish. The fit is excellent and the finish is well done without any extra slag or burs on the slide or frame causing hangups. What’s your take on going with mil-spec for the 1911? Readers' Ratings 4.86/5 (1246) Your Rating? 3. Remington R1 Remington was one of the first companies to make the 1911 when Colt first asked them to help ramp up production during war periods. Remington R1 Enhanced 849 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 849 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The R1 Enhanced ($849) is a great deal considering and can be upgraded to whatever you want it to be. The capacity is 7+1 and the caliber is .45 auto traveling at 850 fps through a 5” sized barrel. $1,000-$1,400 Range At this point, the guns are as close to flawless as you can get before spending a fortune on a handcrafted 1911. The guns run fantastic and need nothing to make them perform better.  People still opt to do trigger work at this price, but it isn’t because the stock trigger is bad. 4. Springfield Armory EMP 3″ in 9mm Springfield 1911 EMP 9mm I own one of these 9mm 1911’s and have shot a lot through it for one year. Springfield 1911 EMP 1200 at Cabelas Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1200 at Cabelas Compare prices (4 found) Cabelas (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Guns.com (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing As far as reliability goes, there is almost none better.  Since I’ve had it in my possession, I’ve not had a single malfunction with it…which is more than I can say for many other guns. And, accuracy out of the 3” officer sized barrel groups well at distances out to 15 yards, even when rapidly fired. Check out our full review here…and now with a full YouTube video too: 5. Colt Delta Elite (10mm) If you live in an area where 4-legged creatures are a threat, enjoy hunting with a handgun, or just like the 10mm cartridge for self-defense… Colt Delta Elite 10mm 1100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Colt’s freshly revised Delta Elite ($1100) may be what you’re looking for. The venerable 10mm outperforms most other self-defense cartridges for semi-automatic weapons, and, while it is a bit more expensive to shoot, it is quite versatile if you reload your own ammo . 10mm Round Please keep in mind that if the .45 ACP or .40 S&W recoil bothers you, you’ll need to stay away from 10mm, because it’s even snappier. The "Colt Delta Elite" ’s MSRP is just $1099 for the standard model, or you can spend $200 more and get the rail gun, to mount a light or laser below the 5” barrel. Want more 1911s in 10mm?  Check out our separate article . 6. Springfield Loaded Operator My first pistol ever was a Stainless Springfield Loaded ($849). Springfield Loaded with Recover Tactical Grips It probably wasn’t the smartest move for a first handgun …but it was just so pretty (and ran well too). But if I had to make my choice again with a ~$1000 1911 budget…I would choose the "Springfield Loaded Operator" ($1089). 1911 Editor's Choice Springfield Loaded Operator 1089 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1089 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing And that’s because it has everything I would want now that I’ve shot some more stuff. The Operator has the stuff that you can’t easily upgrade on a more standard 1911: Accessory Rail Awesome two-tone styling Night Sights 7. Colt Gold Cup Old school competition shooting at its finest. Colt Gold Cup Trophy 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The Colt Gold Cup ($1400) series has tons of aggressive checkering on both the front and back strap, adjustable rear sights, and a fiber optic front sight.  Couple that with a match barrel and you’ve got something that will out shoot you any day. 8. Sig Sauer STX If you need a great 1911 for something like duty carry, you can’t go wrong with a Sig. Sig has a few models of 1911 that they offer, but the one to make this list is the STX. Sig Sauer STX 1911 1080 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1080 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Wide mag well, Nitron Stainless Steel slide, and custom Burled Maple grips complete the package. $1,500+ There are many 1911s that fall into this price range, with some costing several thousands of dollars.  This is the price point where custom makers begin to enter the market with absolutely gorgeous firearms with bells and whistles. 9. Springfield Range Officer (9mm) We wanted to include a 9mm single-stack 1911 on the list. Originally, I went with the STI Trojan, which has sadly been discontinued. Nothing else I’ve shot has beaten it yet, so if you can find one used, go for it! STI Trojan 9mm 1911 However, since it’s a little hard to get ahold of those… we’ve updated this list with our new pick–the Springfield Armory Range Officer ($830). If you’re looking for a 9mm competition pistol, the Range Officer is a performance machine . You get precision, reliability, and plenty of features you want–and nothing you don’t. The rugged, forged frame and slide mean that this baby won’t be letting you down any time soon. Not to mention, the Range Officer has some beautiful, classic styling you’ll love to hold in your hand. Springfield Armory 1911 Range Officer 9mm 830 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 830 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing 10. Wilson Combat CQB with Rail If I had much more coin and wanted one of the best 1911s in my mind…I’d go with the Wilson CQB Tactical LE ($3100). Dream 1911 Wilson Combat CQB Tactical LE 3100 at Wilson Combat Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 3100 at Wilson Combat Prices accurate at time of writing I’ve built a couple 1911’s and always fall back to Wilson parts.  Every time I didn’t…I ended up junking that part and bought Wilson. Wilson Combat CQB with Rail and TLR-1 HL To me, the CQB has it all…the Wilson quality, rails, aggressive grips, and fiber optic sights. Wilson Combat 1911 Light Rail And now…I finally have one!  Full review coming soon… 11. Kimber Amethyst Ultra II Many of Kimber’s firearms are based on the 1911 platform.  They tend to be eye-catching and come in various sizes and calibers. "Kimber Amethyst Ultra" II 1400 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1400 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It’s hard to just pull one of their guns and focus on it, but one such gun of theirs is this Amethyst Ultra II ($1500). It is a sub-compact pistol with a 3” barrel chambered in 9mm or .45 ACP that is primarily geared to women who want a girly-looking gun…whatever their reason for that may be. If you’re looking for something more real-world for women, check out our Best Handguns for Women article. 12. Dan Wesson Bruin (10mm) Dan Wesson has long been a major name in the 1911 world with a host of great offerings – but the Bruin is our favorite. Maybe it’s the burnt bronze, maybe it’s the long slide, maybe it’s the 10mm of awesome…Ya, we love the Bruin. A duty carry finish and fiber optic sights round off this as not only an 1911 worthy of being a piece of art, but also ready for real use. "Dan Wesson Bruin" You might have heard that CZ bought Dan Wesson a few years ago and while many were worried that quality would suffer now that DW wasn’t a small shop anymore, we’re happy to report that people’s fears did not come true. CZ did not go the route of Freedom Group and Dan Wesson is still producing some of the finest 1911s you can get your hands on. The Wildcards Then, of course, there are guns that we’d all love to have, but would never take to the range to shoot simply because they cost as much as the things sitting in our driveway to get us from place to place. One such gun manufacturer is Cabot .  Cabot’s guns start with an MSRP in the $3,200 range, and travel up to 4.5 million dollars for a pair of meteorite-made 1911s, with every imaginable price in between. Cabot Meteorite 1911s, $4.5M If you can afford to shoot one of Cabot’s guns, I’m sure they work flawlessly ( or maybe not ).  I mean, for that price, they better work fantastically. Honorable Mentions Of course, I can’t hit all the 1911’s out there…but here are some honorable mentions for the higher end.  I hope one day to own some of these so I can chime in…but these have impeccable reputations! Nighthawk Custom Ed Brown The Best In Any Price Range: This list wouldn’t be complete if I didn’t talk further about modern-day Colt 1911s. While some enthusiasts will tell you that the R1 isn’t that great or that Kimbers are overrated, you rarely ever hear that about the original 1911 maker. In fact, the only complaint you do hear is that Colt’s 1911s are expensive . Colt Gold Cup While that may be true, they also tend to hold their value better than any of the other production 1911 builders. Furthermore, there are plenty of Colt 1911s available in the $800-900 range.  And you don’t have to go too far to look for them. Colt XSE Government Colt is one of the few firearms makers in existence who is still capable of selling you a firearm with the ability to resell it down the road and make money off it.  All in all, you get the best bang for your buck when you purchase a Colt 1911. They’re reliable, accurate, and have an excellent customer service base.  As a bonus the pistols are sexy. Conclusion The 1911 pistol is a beautiful handgun with a rich history that expands over 100 years. There is no sign of sales declining, and it seems that every year at SHOT Show, there is another 1911 maker entering the scene. If you are late to this game, I’m sure you’ll own one, one day…how could you not? Any we HAVE to put on the list?  Otherwise check out Best 9mm 1911s and Best 10mm 1911s …or even Best .45 ACP Ammo to feed your guns.

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Scope mounting can seem like a huge undertaking . After all the painstaking research on calibers, shooting platforms and optics … you want to be sure your scope and the bore of your rifle are both pointing at the same target when you head to the range. With a few simple tools and some patience and attention to detail, anyone can mount their scope and do it right.